ARK Wealth Insights

Tax Law Grants Some New Opportunity

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Jul 20, 2018 9:42:18 AM

As I notice that two of my clients turn 70 today, I am reminded of two planning opportunities that are worth mentioning. Each became more useful after the new tax bill went into effect on January 1st of this year. With strategies that aren’t particularly new, two changes in the tax code: the increase of the standard deduction, and the lowering of overall rates have opened new windows of opportunity .

Starting January 1, 2010, the rule that limited Roth conversions to taxpayers earning less than $100,000 went away. Effectively, anyone could then convert traditional IRAs to Roths. But, that change wasn’t very helpful because of tax brackets at that time. In 2010, from 100k to 137k of taxable

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Topics: Taxes, Retirement

Use Your Annuity to Pay for Long-Term Care Insurance

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Apr 3, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Use Your Annuity to Pay for Long-Term Care Insurance

The cost of long-term care can quickly deplete your savings and affect the quality of life for you and your family. Long-term care insurance allows you to share that cost with an insurance company. But premiums for long-term care insurance can be expensive, and cash or income to cover those premiums may not be readily available. One option is to exchange your annuity contract for a long-term care insurance policy.

Section 1035 exchange

Generally, withdrawals from a nonqualified deferred annuity (premiums paid with after-tax dollars) are considered to come first from earnings, then from your investment (premiums paid) in the contract. The earnings portion of the withdrawal is treated as income to the annuity owner, subject to ordinary income taxes. IRC Section 1035 allows you to exchange one annuity for another without any immediate tax consequences, as long as certain requirements are met. However, prior to 2010, an annuity couldn't be exchanged for a long-term care insurance policy on a tax-free basis. But the Pension Protection Act (PPA) changed that and, as of January 1, 2010, both life insurance and annuities may be exchanged, tax free, for qualified long-term care insurance.

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Topics: Retirement, Financial Planning, Taxes

Staying on Track with Your Retirement Investments

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Mar 29, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Staying on Track with Your Retirement Investments

Investing for your retirement isn't about getting rich quick. More often, it's about having a game plan that you can live with over a long time. You wouldn't expect to be able to play the piano without learning the basics and practicing. Investing for your retirement over the long term also takes a little knowledge and discipline. Though there can be no guarantee that any investment strategy will be successful and all investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal, there are ways to help yourself build your retirement nest egg.

Compounding is your best friend

It's the "rolling snowball" effect. Put simply, compounding pays you earnings on your reinvested earnings. Here's how it works: Let's say you invest $100, and that money earns a 7% annual return. At the end of a year, the $7 you earned is added to your $100; that would give you $107 in your account. If you earn 7% again the next year, you're earning 7% of $107 rather than $100, as you did in the first year. That adds $7.49 to your account instead of $7. In the third year with a 7% return, you'd earn $8 and have a total of $122. Like a snowball rolling downhill, the value of compounding grows the longer you leave your money in the account. In effect, compounding can do some of the work of building a nest egg for you.

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Topics: Retirement, Financial Planning

A Retirement Income Roadmap for Women

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Mar 27, 2018 8:00:00 AM

A Retirement Income Roadmap for Women

More women are working and taking charge of their own retirement planning than ever before. What does retirement mean to you? Do you dream of traveling? Pursuing a hobby? Volunteering your time, or starting a new career or business? Simply enjoying more time with your grandchildren? Whatever your goal, you'll need a retirement income plan that's designed to support the retirement lifestyle that you envision, and minimize the risk that you'll outlive your savings.

When will you retire?

Establishing a target age is important, because when you retire will significantly affect how much you need to save. For example, if you retire early at age 55 as opposed to waiting until age 67, you'll shorten the time

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Topics: Women and Investing, Retirement

Trusteed IRAs

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Mar 13, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Trusteed IRAs

The tax code allows IRAs to be created as trust accounts, custodial accounts, and annuity contracts. Regardless of the form, the federal tax rules are generally the same for all IRAs. But the structure of the IRA agreement can have a significant impact on how your IRA is administered. This article will focus on a type of trust account commonly called a "trusteed IRA," or an "individual retirement trust."

Why might you need a trusteed IRA?

In a typical IRA, your beneficiary takes control of the IRA assets upon your death. There's nothing to stop your beneficiary from withdrawing all or part of the IRA funds at any time. This ability to withdraw assets at will may be troublesome to you for several reasons. For example, you may simply be concerned that your beneficiary will squander the IRA funds.

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Topics: Retirement, Estate Planning

A Woman's Guide to Health Care in Retirement

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Mar 8, 2018 8:00:00 AM

A Woman's Guide to Health Care in Retirement

At any age, health care is a priority. But when you retire, you should probably focus more on health care than ever before. That's why it's particularly important for women to factor in the cost of health care, including long-term care, as part of their retirement plan.

How much you'll spend on health care during retirement generally depends on a number of variables including when you retire, how long you live, your relative health, and the cost of medical care in your area. Another important factor to consider is the availability of Medicare. Generally, you'll be eligible for Medicare when you reach age 65. But what if you retire at a younger age? You'll need some way to pay for your health care until Medicare kicks in. Your employer may offer health insurance coverage to its retiring employees, but this is the exception rather than the rule. If your employer doesn't extend health benefits, you may be able to get insurance coverage through your spouse's plan. If that's not an option, you may need to buy a private health insurance policy (which could be costly) or extend your employer-sponsored coverage through COBRA.

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Topics: Women and Investing, Retirement

Five Questions about Long-Term Care

Posted by Matthew_Hanshaw-CFP on Mar 1, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Five Questions about Long-Term Care

  1. What is long-term care?

Long-term care refers to the ongoing services and support needed by people who have chronic health conditions or disabilities. There are three levels of long-term care:

  • Skilled care: Generally round-the-clock care that's given by professional health care providers such as nurses, therapists, or aides under a doctor's supervision.
  • Intermediate care: Also provided by professional health care providers but on a less frequent basis than skilled care.
  • Custodial care: Personal care that's often given by family caregivers, nurses' aides, or home health workers who provide assistance with what are called "activities of daily living" such as bathing, eating, and dressing.
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Topics: Retirement, Financial Planning

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